Monday, 3 December 2018

Going Green #22 - Dec 2018


Welcome to Going Green.  This is the place to promote all your green, sustainable, environmental, seasonal, local, organic, fair trade, ethical etc posts ... basically any post that helps or inspires readers to preserve and improve our beautiful world.  If you are not sure what subjects would be good or need some ideas have a look here where you'll find all the details about the linky >>> Going Green Linky.

Green Christmas

2018 has seen somewhat of a shift in the awareness of issues such as plastic pollution and deforestation for products such as palm oil.  People are slowly beginning to make the connection between their lifestyles and Climate Change and, critically, that Climate Change will affect us all, not just someone else far away.

But then along comes Christmas and big businesses go all out with their expensive adverts and shops and online websites packed to the rafters with STUFF, all there with the message that buying more will bring us all so much festive happiness.

Sorry, but I don't buy it (literally) and I hope you don't wither.  Let's take Christmas back from big businesses who care nothing for the planet and only to further their profits and let's have a simpler Christmas.  Buy some presents but from small, local and family businesses, buy experiences not more clutter and overall spend less money on your loved ones but more time with them.  Or try your hand at making things.

Are you with me? Please do share these images if you are.

Dare to be different this Christmas

Support small businesses


Tuesday, 27 November 2018

6 ways to make your Christmas jumper "green"


You would think that A Green and Rosie Life might be the last place you'd find a post about Christmas jumpers, wouldn't you?  After all they pretty much sum up everything I stand against ... an unnecessary item, bought because everyone tells you you should have one (and who wants to be the ONLY person who doesn't have a Christmas jumper?) and quite possibly made from man-made fibres.  They are a bit of short term fun, worn a handful of times, maybe a social media post or two and then the poor old thing get consigned to the back of the cupboard or worse still the bin.  You've guessed it, I am not a fan.  However, the truth is, that for the foreseeable future they are probably here to stay and when I recently heard that some schools now have "Wear a Christmas jumper to school days", more people than ever will be buying them. With that in mind here's 6 ways you green up your Christmas jumper and make it more sustainable.



6 ways to Green up your Christmas Jumper


  1. Make you own. If you are no good at knitting you could decorate or upcycle a jumper you already have.  Hobbycraft have some brilliant ideas to try out. 
  2. It's nice and warm so you can turn the heating down a degree now.  
  3. If you are really going to buy a new one make sure it is in natural materials and made ethically and choose one that you'd be happy wearing all through the colder weather.
  4. Buy a secondhand one.
  5. Get as much wear from it as you can and remember to wear the same one next year.
  6. Swap with a friend - an easy way to get a new jumper without buying one.

What do you think about Christmas jumpers and can you think of any more ways to make them as green as the Christmas trees on them?

Sustainable Chsristmas jumper ideas

Thursday, 22 November 2018

Deforestation, palm oil and Black Friday Shopping


Are you some-one who is outraged at the banning of the Iceland (supermarket) advert outlining the plight of orangutans in the face of increased deforestation for palm oil plantations ?

Were you even aware of the issue before seeing this advert that is now so prevalent across social media?

Now let me ask you 2 more questions ...

  • Are you planning to buy anything in a  Black Friday sale event, either in a shop or online?

  • Are you busy wondering what Christmas gifts to buy all your family and friends, searching online lists of what to buy a difficult teenager or elderly relative etc or grabbing the latest ideas from slick TV adverts?

Consumerism fuels deforestation

Sunday, 11 November 2018

8 Christmas decoration ideas using natural materials


The origin of decorating houses for Christmas actually goes back to Egyptian times and relates to a time when the  people brought branches from evergreen trees inside to celebrate the winter solstice on December 21st. This practice was also commonplace amongst the Druids, Romans and Vikings.  From the 16th century families began to add simple natural decorations such as candles and nuts but it was in the 1840's when a magazine showed an image of Queen Victoria and her family celebrating around a decorated Christmas tree that the era of brightly decorated trees and houses was born.  Everyone wanted to do the same and manufacturers quickly realised there was money to be made from this new craze.

Today Christmas decorations continue to big money as families vie to have the best display.  Lendedu calculated that the average American will spend just over 12% of their Christmas outlay on decorations at a cost of almost 90$.  In Britain this is lower but Statista calculated that in 2017 it still averaged just over £30. 

Tree decorations were traditionally made from glass, wood, metal or ceramics but more and more are now made from plastic.  Tinsel and glitter are also made from plastic as are lights, wall hangings, table decorations etc.  And you can be sure that many will come in plastic packaging and almost none will be recyclable.

So how can you have a decorated house at Christmas without all the plastic and waste?  The simplest solution is to turn back the clock and have decorations made from natural materials which you will be able to gather and make yourself.  If you need some inspiration have a look at what these bloggers have made.

Ideas for natural Christmas decorations

Monday, 5 November 2018

Going Green #21 - Nov 2018


Welcome to Going Green.  This is the place to promote all your green, sustainable, environmental, seasonal, local, organic, fair trade, ethical etc posts ... basically any post that helps or inspires readers to preserve and improve our beautiful world.  If you are not sure what subjects would be good or need some ideas have a look here where you'll find all the details about the linky >>> Going Green Linky.

Natural Christmas


Now that Halloween is over I feel it is safe to mention Christmas but, of course, not in the go out and buy LOADS of stuff sort of a way but in the "Let's celebrate with Nature in mind" sort of a way.  I would like to put together a post showcasing examples of how you can use natural materials to make Christmas decorations - tree hangings, table and room decorations, present toppers and wreaths etc.  If you have a suitable post showing how to make any natural Christmas decorations please do let me know. Can you drop me a link on this Facebook post - Natural Christmas decorations - before Nov 12th.

Thank you!


My picks from Going Green Oct 2018


Thank you to everyone who linked up last month and what a great range of posts you gave us, making it all the more difficult for me to choose 3 favourites.  But here goes:  

Saturday, 20 October 2018

E471 - the hidden palm oil in peanut butter


As a treat and as a change from all the jam I make, we do like the odd jar of peanut butter yet trying to find some we are happy to buy has been an interesting journey.

First of all so many varieties are sold in plastic jars - no thank you.

Then a read of the ingredients shows many contain palm oil.  No thanks again.

Enter Sun-Pat peanut butter.  Glass jar (albeit with a plastic lid) and no palm oil.  Happy enough with that, or so I thought. On Instagram @BusyGreenMum posted a picture recently saying she hoped she had finally found a peanut butter that was palm oil free and she hoped it wasn't hiding under an E number or something.  The ingredient list she also posted showed it contained E471: 

E471 is a synthetic fat, produced mainly from plant origins but in some cases also from animal fats.  The most commonly used fat/oil to make E471 is palm oil.

Sun-Pat peanut butter contains palm oil - hidden in the additive E471

Sunday, 7 October 2018

How to have an Eco-Friendly Autumn


Leaves, the temperature and rain are falling. Summer has gone and autumn is here. As the season changes read on to find out how you can make your autumn Eco-friendly.

Eco-friendly autumn



How to have an Eco-Friendly Autumn


1. Clothes


It can be all too easy to buy new clothes for the new season but even sustainable fashion items come with a cost to the environment, especially if you don't actually need any new items.  First of all head to your wardrobe and see what you already have.
  • Get out your sewing machine and re-purpose existing clothes into new ones.
  • Make your own clothes - learn to knot, sew or crochet.
  • Get together with a group of friends and have a clothes swap party.
  • If you do need new clothes then buy "new to you" from second hand stores and online.
  • If buying totally new go for quality clothes made from natural materials in a timeless style that will last the test of time.
  • If you have clothes you really don't want and can't give to friends downgrade them to something else such as cleaning cloths. T-Shirt bags or use them in the garden to protect plants.  This post has 7 ideas to keep clothes out of landfill.

Monday, 1 October 2018

Going Green #20 - Oct 2018


Welcome to Going Green.  This is the place to promote all your green, sustainable, environmental, seasonal, local, organic, fair trade, ethical etc posts ... basically any post that helps or inspires readers to preserve and improve our beautiful world.  If you are not sure what subjects would be good or need some ideas have a look here where you'll find all the details about the linky >>> Going Green Linky.

Please can you answer this quick question ... it will help me with a post I am writing:


E471 is an emulsifier and stabiliser found in some processed foods including some peanut butters.  Do you know what it is made from? If you don't know please say so.
Please answer WITHOUT first searching online.  If you want to search up afterwards and comment further then can you do so by sending me a message via my Facebook page.

Thank you!

Monday, 24 September 2018

Do more for the planet by buying less


If there is ONE thing we can all to to help reduce our impact on the planet is is to BUY LESS ... and that includes so called green or eco-friendly alternatives.  Let me explain using one commonly used item as an example:

** Wet Wipes **


The first wet wipes appeared in the late 1950's but it is in the last few years that they have really taken off - our supermarket shelves and online shops are groaning under the weight of wipes for everything - for bottoms from the cradle to the grave, for every surface in your house and beyond, for make-up removal, for hands and faces, for screens, for pets ... wipes for pets??  That was a new one on me!


Wet wipes - do we really need them?


Friday, 14 September 2018

Gardening in a heatwave


I recently wrote a post explaining what all the effects of Climate Change will be and included this point about agriculture:

"Drought, flooding and changes in seasonal temperatures will mean farmers having to cope with either too much or too little water and increased levels of pests and diseases.  These negative effects on agriculture will result in increased food prices globally, food shortages and more famines."

As we bid farewell to the heatwave summer 2018, where temperatures rocketed and rain was almost non existent it seems like a good time to assess how one hot summer affected my vegetable garden at Eco-Gites of Lenault and consider how the heat will have affected farmers.