Wednesday, 27 January 2016

The War Cemetery at St Charles-de-Percy


Scattered throughout northern Normandy are many war cemeteries where the fallen from WWII are buried in the country where they fell.  16 kms to the west of Eco-Gites of Lenault, just outside the small village of St Charles-de-Percy, is the most southerly of these where 809 British soldiers have found their final resting place.  They all died late in July or early August 1944 in the major allied thrust to get from Caumont L'Evente to the important town of Vire, driving a wedge through the German 7th Army and Panzer Group West.


As with all British war cemeteries they are maintained beautifully.  Each row of graves has a small area for plants around it, the edges perfectly straight and no weeds to be seen.  The grass is a perfect lawn.  A fitting place of calm for these brave men to lie after the horrors of war.  

Even in January, when I visited, there was colour and new growth to be seen, testament that their death was not in vain.  As was said on one grave I saw - "He died that we might live".  

Thank you brave soldiers.

Perfectly maintained beds

Heather at the ends of the rows of graves

Wych hazel

 Oxlip

Aubretia


For more details on other memorials please visit this blog on our website - Closest WWII Memorials to Eco-Gites of Lenault.


For more gardens post please do head over to Annie's lovely How does your Garden Grow linky:


Mammsaurus HDYGG

18 comments :

  1. I always think of how young so many of these soldiers were..So good to see how the cemetery is beautifully kept and flowers are keeping company with these brave souls.

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    1. My thoughts exactly, Kriss. I am so glad I went there and saw it so well maintained.

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  2. It's beautifully kept and I love the flowers. These men truly deserve never to be forgotten #hdygg

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  3. It's nice that they are so well maintained. Lots of work must go into keeping those stones so clean and white. The little splashes of colour in the flowers makes me feel sad even though they should be something to smile about; I don't know why. Thanks for sharing this.

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    1. That was how I felt, it was a very moving place and whilst I loved seeing the plants I knew they were only there because the soldiers had died.

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  4. Very serene and lovely to see so well kept. I am often in cemeteries and they are little havens for plants and wildlife too, helpful for quiet contemplation.

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    1. I love cemeteries, the stories told in the gravestones and their wildlife and flowers (wild or cultivated) but the war cemeteries are something a bit different with so many men buried there who died unnecessarily.

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  5. I think it's wonderful that they are so well kept...a true mark of respect. Such a tragic loss of so many young lives though, it must be very moving when you're there. #hdygg

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    1. All the war cemeteries are immaculate. We found a single Commonwealth Grave grave in a churchyard whilst walking one day that contained the bodies of several airmen whose plane had crashed nearby. It, too, was perfectly maintained so some-one must visit it on a regular basis. The airmen deserve that.

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  6. i've visited a few war graves in France and Belgium and I am stunned at the upkeep of them

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    1. Exactly - they are all so well kept and long may that continue.

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  7. Beautiful Rosie. When we visited Omaha last year when we came over I remember thinking how seeing all those graves really brings home the sheer numbers of men that died in the war.
    Thanks for joining in again lovely x

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    1. I didn't go to the cemetery with a view to writing a gardening post but walking round my eye was drawn to the plants and the words of the gravestones. And to think this is a small cemetery compared to others. Too much unnecessary death. Will we never learn?

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  8. They always look so serene and rightly, well kept - and yes - thank you brave soldiers

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    1. Yes, thank you brave soldiers. Yo lost your lives so we could be free today.

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  9. oh wow. that is indeed a beautiful cemetery. i have never seen them with space for plantings. it only makes perfect sense though

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    1. All the British War cemeteries in Normandy have beautiful garden spaces like this. I didn't go to photograph the gardens but I was immediately drawn to their beauty.

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